archiemcphee:

South Dakota-based artist John Lopez (previously featured here) creates awesome life-size sculptures of animals by welding together pieces of scrap metal, often pieces of abandoned farm machinery collected from local ranchers and farmers that he’s known since he was a kid. The creatures he creates are so lifelike that it’s hard to believe their myriad parts and pieces were ever used for anything else.

Visit John Lopez’s website, blog and Facebook page to check out more of his magnificent metalwork.

[via Twisted Sifter and Dailymail.co.uk]

thehillsarenothere:

okay u can make fun of Shrek all you want but if u don’t think they were the most beautiful fucking movies ever then ur wrong

llamammama:

unamusedsloth:

Le Gogh


I just can’t help it. I’m sorry.

llamammama:

unamusedsloth:

Le Gogh

I just can’t help it. I’m sorry.

default album art
Sgr Wr Gng Dwn
Fall Out Boy
1048343 Plays

the-winter-solider:

ohyeahlashton:

ajollyhappysoulpunk:

actuallyali:

aeyelaeyen:

download

what

I actually started screaming “AM I MOR-” really loudly and now I’m amazed and embarrassed at the same time.

wHAGAT

OMG

memegrrrl:

uglygirlsassociation:

if your child says something offensive without knowing its meaning, don’t make excuses for them, educate them

And try find out where they picked up those terms/actions

desiedynastee:

Probably one of the best pro-choice arguments I ever did see.

desiedynastee:

Probably one of the best pro-choice arguments I ever did see.

tjmystic:

paintedladyspirit:

I cannot begin to express how appreciative I am of what the Legend of Korra is doing in terms of addressing mental health. These last two episodes have blown me away. The writers have managed to craft a story with true depth and a sort of realism that’s so rare. I can honestly say I have never watched a show where the protagonist’s mental illness and/or struggles were treated with such respect and honesty.
I know I already wrote about this, but the latest episode (The Coronation) really sealed my impression with the inclusion of Korra’s scenes with Toph. Toph’s tough love approach was definitely what we all expected from her, but it was also something else. It was a perspective that is almost NEVER portrayed accurately - the really sucky, toxic, and sometimes near addictive aspects of mental illness.
When Toph accused Korra of not letting her remove the poison, I instantly thought back to my own experience with depression. At my darkest point, it was really hard to think about getting better. I couldn’t picture it, and honestly at times it felt easier to stay depressed. If I was always so tired and had a hard time even getting out of bed, then why even bother trying to get better? Being sad was hard, but putting effort into not being sad was even harder.
It was a vicious cycle that I’ve never been able to fully explain, but the fact that this show even metaphorically implied it is groundbreaking. (Of course, I only speak for myself and my personal experience, so do understand that I’m not trying to be spokesperson or anything).
Can you imagine if other shows were inspired to take the perils of mental illness head-on? So many more people would understand, or feel comforted. I’m just grateful that LOK is doing what it’s doing.

And let’s not forget that the original series included two siblings who were victims of severe childhood abuse, to the degree that one had half of his face burnt off and the other bordered on being psycho/sociopathic (not to mention Zuko’s obvious anger issues, or the fan theories that Azula was being sexually groomed by Ozai).  And when it would’ve been easy to dismiss these characters as useless, as if they were lost causes, “Avatar” decided to make them the most dynamic characters in the entire show.  I’d hazard a guess that at least 60% of the fandom- including women, men, and whoever else - identify Zuko as their favorite character, and I bet the same amount of people are more compelled and terrified by Azula than her father.  And it’s no wonder.  Despite all the issues Zuko had with his absent mother, murderous father and and grandfather, and purposefully malicious sister, he survived to become Fire Lord, King, and, for that matter, the first one to issue in a reign of peace in over 100 years.  Azula, despite undergoing fourteen years of grooming and what we can only assume was relentless training by a tainted father, she became the most talented firebender of the age and took down (not invaded - completely overthrew) a city that even a whole army of her people couldn’t touch. In two days.  With only two other girls supporting her.  And she was only fourteen.
And the best part?  Even though she’s a villain, we still get to see her be “weak”.  We still get to see her psychotic breakdown, complete with paranoia and hallucinations of her supposedly dead mother.  And even though we’ve learned to hate her through this series, even though we love to hate her for her every vile deed, we feel sorry for her.  In that last shot of her, writhing on the floor in agony, we feel pity, compassion.  And yes, realistically, the world is a better place without her being at the top of her game.  But even more realistically?  She’s just a sad little girl who’d been brainwashed to win at any cost, even if that cost was her brother.  
At the end of the day, we don’t blame her.  We might still hate her a little for all that she did, but we don’t blame her.  We blame her father.  And we blame whatever psychosis ran through the royal family, regardless of the fact that that psychosis was never named.  

tjmystic:

paintedladyspirit:

I cannot begin to express how appreciative I am of what the Legend of Korra is doing in terms of addressing mental health. These last two episodes have blown me away. The writers have managed to craft a story with true depth and a sort of realism that’s so rare. I can honestly say I have never watched a show where the protagonist’s mental illness and/or struggles were treated with such respect and honesty.

I know I already wrote about this, but the latest episode (The Coronation) really sealed my impression with the inclusion of Korra’s scenes with Toph. Toph’s tough love approach was definitely what we all expected from her, but it was also something else. It was a perspective that is almost NEVER portrayed accurately - the really sucky, toxic, and sometimes near addictive aspects of mental illness.

When Toph accused Korra of not letting her remove the poison, I instantly thought back to my own experience with depression. At my darkest point, it was really hard to think about getting better. I couldn’t picture it, and honestly at times it felt easier to stay depressed. If I was always so tired and had a hard time even getting out of bed, then why even bother trying to get better? Being sad was hard, but putting effort into not being sad was even harder.

It was a vicious cycle that I’ve never been able to fully explain, but the fact that this show even metaphorically implied it is groundbreaking. (Of course, I only speak for myself and my personal experience, so do understand that I’m not trying to be spokesperson or anything).

Can you imagine if other shows were inspired to take the perils of mental illness head-on? So many more people would understand, or feel comforted. I’m just grateful that LOK is doing what it’s doing.

And let’s not forget that the original series included two siblings who were victims of severe childhood abuse, to the degree that one had half of his face burnt off and the other bordered on being psycho/sociopathic (not to mention Zuko’s obvious anger issues, or the fan theories that Azula was being sexually groomed by Ozai).  And when it would’ve been easy to dismiss these characters as useless, as if they were lost causes, “Avatar” decided to make them the most dynamic characters in the entire show.  I’d hazard a guess that at least 60% of the fandom- including women, men, and whoever else - identify Zuko as their favorite character, and I bet the same amount of people are more compelled and terrified by Azula than her father.  And it’s no wonder.  Despite all the issues Zuko had with his absent mother, murderous father and and grandfather, and purposefully malicious sister, he survived to become Fire Lord, King, and, for that matter, the first one to issue in a reign of peace in over 100 years.  Azula, despite undergoing fourteen years of grooming and what we can only assume was relentless training by a tainted father, she became the most talented firebender of the age and took down (not invaded - completely overthrew) a city that even a whole army of her people couldn’t touch. In two days.  With only two other girls supporting her.  And she was only fourteen.

And the best part?  Even though she’s a villain, we still get to see her be “weak”.  We still get to see her psychotic breakdown, complete with paranoia and hallucinations of her supposedly dead mother.  And even though we’ve learned to hate her through this series, even though we love to hate her for her every vile deed, we feel sorry for her.  In that last shot of her, writhing on the floor in agony, we feel pity, compassion.  And yes, realistically, the world is a better place without her being at the top of her game.  But even more realistically?  She’s just a sad little girl who’d been brainwashed to win at any cost, even if that cost was her brother.  

At the end of the day, we don’t blame her.  We might still hate her a little for all that she did, but we don’t blame her.  We blame her father.  And we blame whatever psychosis ran through the royal family, regardless of the fact that that psychosis was never named.  

latefines:

casketscratcher:

nathanielemmett:

Harry Potter characters as imagined by Makani.

THAT’S MY SIRIUS

Eeeeeeeeee